October 27, 2011

Canning Apple Pie Filling with My Dad {Naptime Webisode}

In today’s naptime webisode I am canning apple pie filling with my Dad. As most of you know, I love canning with my Dad. And, despite the fact that he bought me my very own canning equipment for our home in Connecticut, I still like to do it with him when we visit Cooperstown. In this webisode you’ll notice my lips moving while I talk over the picture, that is because Dad and I were chatting the entire time we did this project. We were catching up on all the news around town and, of course, all the happenings at pre-school here in Connecticut. Our canning projects are more than just the chance to preserve delicious food, they are our time to catch up with each other. While all this was going on my daughter was out and about with Mere-Mere (her name for my Mom). This was the easiest way to do it because this project is tough with children underfoot. If your kids are at home, make sure they are occupied with an activity so they don’t come running over to you while the water and filling bubbles away on the stove, it is very hot and could be dangerous. Apple Pie Filling This recipe made exactly 7-quarts of filling. This means we can look forward to seven apple pies anytime we want all year long. Sure, I could make an apple pie from scratch whenever I want, but it is SO much easier to have the fresh filling already on hand. It is also exceptionally delicious since we made the fillings with apples that were at their absolute peak ripeness. There is truly nothing tastier than preserving fresh local produce at its peak. I hope all you naptime canners enjoy this as much as we did. I promise it is a very worthwhile canning project!

It is well worth noting that this pie filling does not have to be used only for pie, here are some great ideas for how else you can use it!:

* Mini-Apple Pielettes baked in muffins cups from Dorie Greenspan

* Apple-Speculoos Crumble from Dorie Greenspan

* Apple Turnover filling like these Rosemary Apple Turnovers with Honey on The Kitchn

* Filling for Quick & Easy Apple Strudel like on What Megan’s Making

* Apple Crumble filling like this Caramel Apple Ginger Crumble on Naptime Chef

* Classic Apple Cobbler from Simply Recipes

Recipe

 Canning Apple Pie Filling

adapted from National Center for Home Food Preservation

Makes 7 quarts

Ingredients

6 quarts peeled, cored and sliced fresh apples – blanched
5 cups granulated sugar
1 ½ cups cornstarch
1 tablespoon ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon ground nutmeg
2 ½ cups cold water
5 cups apple cider
¾ cups bottled lemon juice, plus more for the apple slices

Instructions

1. We used a mix of Fiji and Cortland apples. MacIntosh also taste delicious. Use whatever apples you prefer for your apple pie fillings.

2. Place a very large stock-pot on the stovetop and fill with 1 gallon of water. Turn on the heat to medium high to begin to bring it to a boil.

3. In a separate large pot mix the sugar, spices, cornstarch, water and apple cider and set aside.

4. Wash, peel and core the apples. Slice them into pieces ¼ to ½-inch thick and place them in a bowl containing a solutaion of ¼ cup lemon juice mixed with 1 quart water. Once all of the apples have been peeled and sliced, drain the lemon juice solution and place 6 cups of the slices at a time into the stockpot with the boiling water. Boil for 1 minute once the water has returned to a boil. Use a handheld strainer to scoop out the slices and place them in heatproof bowls and cover them with clean cotton kitchen towels. Repeat this process with all of the slices.

5. When the apple slices are finished blanching turn the heat on under the pot with the apple cider mixture to bring it to a boil, stirring frequently. Also, at this time it is a good idea to fill up the pot you plan to use for processing the jars and begin to bring that water to a boil as well since it will take a while.

6. As the cider solution begins to warm up stir it frequently until it begins to bubble. Add the lemon juice and boil for one minute, stirring constantly. Carefully add in the warm apple slices and fold them into the thickened cider solution with a wide spatula. Remove the pot from the heat and set it on a heatproof surface next to the canning rack with the sterilized jars.

7. Carefully ladle the mixture into each jar until full, leaving 1-inch headspace at the top. Wipe the tops of the jars clean with a kitchen towel, place the lids on, followed by the rims and tighten them with your hand. Tighten them only as much as you can do with your own strength, do not try to force it to be super-tight.

8. Lower the canning rack full of the jars into the boiling water to process. See the altitude/processing time chart below to determine the appropriate processing time for your location. Once the jars have processed, remove them from the boiling water and place them in a cool, dry place and cover them with a kitchen towel. Let them rest, undisturbed for at least 12 hours, or until all the seals have formed and the jars are completely cool.

*Processing time for pint or quart jars: 0 – 1000ft: 25 minutes, 1001-3000ft: 30 minutes, 3001 – 6000ft: 30 minutes, Above 6000 feet: 40 minutes

Naptime Notes

Naptime Recipe Serving ideas

This pie filling will fill a classic double crust apple pie!

Naptime Stopwatch

2 hours with two people

Naptime Reviews

We’ve already made one pie it was a huge hit. I look forward to making another one at Christmas!

More Naptime Recipes

  • Lauren

    LOVED it!!!!! Have to say I am WAY too afraid to try canning….Sounds delic!!!!!!!!! Bean misses your Miss D.

    • Anonymous

      We miss you too, Lauren and Bean! A holiday get together??

  • Jill in NC

    A neighbor and I did this last year for a middle school band fundraiser.  We sold close to 100 jars of “apple pie in a jar”!  Every once in a while, I would add cardamom to the recipe.  They made great Christmas presents.

    • Anonymous

      That is awesome, Jill!

  • M1herrneckar

    We love apple pie in a jar. I was wondering where you got the adjustable apple slicer corer?

  • http://erecipe.com Raquel Erecipe

    is it the same procedure canning other fruits like strawberries?